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Cosmetic shooting in Tulum

Posted by Fabrice Gilbert in Advertising, Movies, Scouting

A 1 day video shooting with Alexa mini, Drone and Underwater camera in beautiful Tulum for a french cosmetic brand.

We proposed a open Laguna for the larges view and a intimiste small private Cenote for the closed one.

All the production have been design to be able to move quickly from a location to another without undermining the technique and confort and preserving the work of the data managers.

the Model confort have been one of our primary concern as ever with our favorite local french make up artist Sarah and Lidia as an assistant.

    

16 Mar 2017 no comments / READ MORE

Hollbox, the new Tulum. 2 hours drive from Cancun Airport.

Posted by Fabrice Gilbert in Scouting

Located to the northwest of Cancun, Mexico, Holbox Island is just 26 miles / 42 km long. Holbox is separated from the mainland coast of Mexico by a shallow lagoon which gives sanctuary to thousands of flamingos, pelicans and other exotic birds and creatures.

Most of the people of Holbox Island make their living fishing. It is common to see fishermen walking through Holbox Village with their catch of the day or carrying their nets. The streets of Holbox Island are made of white sand, common of Caribbean islands, and there are very few cars. Holbox is considered a virgin tourist destination because very few outsiders visit the island. In spite of Holbox’ natural beauty, inaccessibility has left it unspoiled by mass tourism.

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01 Juin 2015 no comments / READ MORE

The five things you can’t miss in Mexico

Posted by Fabrice Gilbert in Scouting

WHETHER it’s Mayan mysteries, sublime surfing, fascinating folk, wonderful wildlife or just relaxing on a sugar-white beach, this amazing country has plenty to offer

Mexico: smoking volcanoes, steaming jungles, endless sandy beaches; teeming cities, dusty villages, majestic ancient temples – all held together by a people of exceptional warmth and hospitality.

MEXICO’S TOP FIVE

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09 Déc 2014 no comments / READ MORE

Secret Luxury Spots In The Bohemian Beach Paradise Of Tulum, Mexico

Posted by Fabrice Gilbert in Scouting

My first impressions of Tulum, Mexico were not promising. The multiple police checkpoints en-route and the rough deep pot holes lining the dirt roads were enough to jar my senses in this coastal town 80 miles southeast of Cancun. So much has been written about this scruffy beach escape from the New York fashion bloggers that I was already prepared for the onslaught of mosquitoes, while living with limited electricity and communing with the jungle creatures and supermodels.

As my driver pulled off the weather worn roadway, a tall thatched structure loomed from the jungle trees, a tropical vision from the pages of Swiss Family Robinson. A mangrove jungle rising before the resort opening up to a sheer white limestone sandy beachfront fronting Soliman Bay revealing the refreshing Jashita Hotel. Outside the aroma of fresh flowers and fragrance woke me from my cranky stupor and I took a deep breath entering the open air lobby.  I was told with a smile that my room was upgraded to the Nefertiti Suite and my weary spirit was immediately lifted. You would be hard pressed not to immediately fall in love with this place as I entered the gorgeous lobby straight out of a design magazine and with margarita in hand quickly melted into the atmosphere…

Read on www.Forbes.com

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12 Sep 2014 no comments / READ MORE

Six beach retreats in Mexico

Posted by Fabrice Gilbert in Scouting

It’s probably not a coincidence if tree of the six best beach retreat are located at few miles from our office.

 

 

La Semilla: Playa del Carmen

This nine-room B&B in the resort city of Playa del Carmen features furniture picked up at flea markets and haciendas across the Yucatán Peninsula.

The result is a “rough luxe” look which embraces imperfections. Salvaged planks of whitewashed wood line the walls in the rooms, where wire-frame beds, vintage road signs, dangling ceiling lights and old-fashioned desk fans abound.

Elsewhere, upturned apple crates act as bedside tables and traditional cupboards are replaced with suspended coat hangers.

The Cocina Loft makes for an engaging breakfast room, with mismatched armchairs, scattered sofas and low coffee tables that lead on to a large, leafy courtyard, which brims with tropical plants and outdoor seating. Come sunset, head to the roof terrace for views of Caribbean Sea.

Villa Las Estrellas: Tulum

On the shores of Tulum, Villa Las Estrellas – “the house of stars” – sparkles with a collection of airy, double-height rooms. Each of the nine suites is centred on a linen-draped, four-poster bed, which shifts with the sea breeze.

Go here if you seek barefoot luxury, but not if you’re after an all-singing, all-dancing resort – the remoteness of this jungle-backed region means there are no phones or TVs. Instead, drop into the restaurant for fresh octopus and chilled margaritas, or head out to explore the area’s clifftop Mayan ruins.

CasaSandra: Isla Holbox

The owner of this casa on the Caribbean island of Holbox is an artist, who has lavished the space with her own creations. Works by the likes of Roberto Fabelo and Noel Morera, two contemporary Cuban artists, also line the walls.

The 19 rooms are classically Mexican, with open-fronted decks, bright hammocks and traditional woven fabrics. Outside, visit the hotel’s restaurant, which has won praise from Noma chef René Redzepi or head off-site to search for hawksbill turtles, flamingos, pelicans and whale sharks.

the big six mexican beach retreats by « The Independent. »

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12 Sep 2014 no comments / READ MORE

Underwater Secrets of the Maya: Cenote

Posted by Fabrice Gilbert in Scouting

A cenote from Yucatec Maya dzonot or ts’onotis a natural pit, or sinkhole resulting from the collapse of limestone bedrock that exposes groundwater underneath. Especially associated with the Yucatán Peninsula of Mexico, cenotes were sometimes used by the ancient Maya for sacrificial offerings.

The term derives from a word used by the low-land Yucatec Maya, « Ts’onot » to refer to any location with accessible groundwater. Cenotes are common geological forms in low latitude regions, particularly on islands, coastlines, and platforms with young post-Paleozoic limestones that have little soil development.

Underwater Secrets of the Maya by National Geographic

28 Août 2014 no comments / READ MORE

Los 25 Mejores Hoteles en México del 2013

Posted by Fabrice Gilbert in Scouting

Todos esos pequeños detalles como la sonrisa que recibes al llegar a recepción, la camaradería del botones, el esmero en el servicio del hostess, el buen sazón de un cocinero o hasta el saludo de un jardinero al darte los buenos días, hacen la diferencia entre un buen hotel y un hotel extraordinario.

Es por eso que en esta ocasión queremos compartir contigo los 25 hoteles que han superado las expectativas de sus huéspedes durante este 2013 gracias a sus instalaciones, al lujo, a su gastronomía, a los paisajes que ofrecen, pero sobre todo y en primer lugar a su gente. Tratamos de ser imparciales y lo más objetivo posible basándonos en las opiniones más recientes de tripadvisor, ¿Nos acompañas?

www.mexicodestino.com

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25 Août 2014 no comments / READ MORE

Jorge Pardo’s house in Yucatan.

Posted by Fabrice Gilbert in Scouting

Jorge Pardo had never studied design, trained as an architect, or built a house when he undertook the creation of his first home on a hill high above downtown Los Angeles. In 1993, having been invited to present an exhibition at the city’s Museum of Contemporary Art (MoCA), the then 30-year-old Cuban-born artist proposed instead that he would build his own house, six miles away, and exhibit it as a work of art. A horseshoe-shaped single-story redwood structure that curled in on itself, Pardo’s 4166 Sea View Lane was closed to the street but open in the back, with windows offering views of the sea, the other rooms, and the landscaped courtyard. Every element—the lamps, furniture, tiles, garden, and kitchen cabinets—was designed by Pardo. For five weeks in 1998, five years after the initial commission, visitors were led on tours by docents in a kind of play on the real estate agent/client tango. Inside, the artist had installed his 110 hand-blown-glass lights, borrowed for the occasion from the Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen in Rotterdam, Netherlands. When the show closed, Pardo moved in.

His home was the first of his works to grab the art world’s attention, though certainly not the last to confound viewers and critics. Was it art? Design? Design art? Architecture? Was Pardo scamming the museum to get a free place to live, as one of its board members first wondered?

Nowhere is that approach brought into sharper relief than at Tecoh, the sprawling series of buildings, structures, pools, and gardens that has consumed Pardo for the past six years. It lies on 740 acres deep in the northern Yucatán jungle, on the ruins of a 17th-century hacienda that made rope until synthetics wiped out the global market for agave fiber and plunged the surrounding villages into decline. Here, Pardo has combined Mayan culture and modern design, local craftsmanship and computer-generated technology, natural landscapes and fantastical interiors to produce a suite of kaleidoscopic experiences.

http://www.wmagazine.com

 

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21 Août 2014 no comments / READ MORE

Merida authentic city // Mexico

Posted by Fabrice Gilbert in Scouting

Dilapidated but still grand, the colonial city of Mérida was once home to the greatest concentration of wealth in the world. It was the sisal barons of the 19th century who hired Parisian architects to build the opulent villas along Paseo de Montejo, a wannabe Champs-Elysées. Yet Mérida, the inland capital of Mexico’s beach-famous Yucatán, is not an Important City and herein lies its charm. It is not packed with visitors. You never feel you are trudging the well-worn path of someone else’s Grand Tour. The white horse-drawn carriages gaudily decorated with lurid fake flowers bear more Mexican families than foreigners as they clip-clop along.

Like Havana, for which the city doubled in the film Before Night Falls, the historical centre known simply as Centro has had a Unesco makeover. It’s not always easy to spot. While the cobbled streets are mostly swept, and the gardens of the Plaza Grande are manicured and in flower – its glossy-leaved trees sculpted into squat oblongs or perfect spheres – still the tangled wiring of telephones and electricity hangs low and wild, and local buses belch black fumes as they charge down the narrow streets.

There are as many derelict buildings as there are restored ones. Here a newly painted white façade with Yves Klein-blue brickwork, there a faded terracotta one with peeling, panelled shutters. All are secured by old iron bars. Peer into a run-down house, with windows hanging off their hinges, and you’ll see impressively proportioned rooms with intricately tiled floors just visible through the layers of dust, an overgrown tropical courtyard and, as an estate agent might phrase it, bags of potential…

http://www.cntraveller.com

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31 Juil 2014 no comments / READ MORE

19th century Hacienda step back

Posted by Fabrice Gilbert in Scouting

This Hacienda never been restored, same pieces of furniture, same wall paint. It’s a 100 years jump in the past for the most original photo shoot surrounding by the ghosts. This amazing Hacienda is waiting for you at 30 mn from Merida.

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14 Jan 2014 no comments / READ MORE

A Asiatic & English mixed style Hacienda

Posted by Fabrice Gilbert in Scouting

This Hacienda is a dream. A eclectic mix of Asiatic pieces of Art with English pieces of furnitures in a Mexican Hacienda. At 15mn drive from Merida, some rooms are available for the team. The best discovery of our last scouting trip in Yucatan.

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14 Jan 2014 no comments / READ MORE

Bienvenue

Posted by guim in Partner, Scouting

C’est un grand jour pour nous. Nous nous sommes finalement décidés a officialiser par un site internet, les 2 années de travail à Playa del Carmen. Sortir d’un travail confidentiel avec quelques productions, néanmoins de plus en plus nombreuses pour offrir au plus grand nombre, notre expérience, notre expertise et notre plaisir de vous faire découvrir cette magnifique partie du monde. Bienvenue donc à cette grande inauguration.

 

 

 

15 Oct 2013 no comments / READ MORE